Sacramento Valley CAMFT

 Support for Your Professional Growth



May 2015
 Newsletter Editors:  Heather Blessing &
 Karen Ulep & Margaret Greenough
newslettereditor@sacramentovalleycamft.org 
 

Letter from the Board

May 1, 2015

Dear Member,

May is Mental Health Month. I sit and watch the violent images on tv, social media and print this week and think of the many children that live with this crisis and trauma on a daily basis and its effect on their well being and mental health. I saw a poem yesterday by a little girl posted on a wall in an elementary school.  A line in her poem read that she understood she could not afford a dog. She dreamt of the day that she could be an adult and  afford one.  It  hit me harder than I expected after all these years of working with children. She just wanted something warm and cuddly that she could love.  What is our job as therapists and healers? What is “mental health month” What is our responsibility individually and as an organization to advocate for those in our community, especially the young and vulnerable. The children that cannot afford a puppy to love and from which to get comfort?  What is our responsibility as an organization to help bring mental health issues into the forefront with honest conversation,  without prejudice and blame? I ask myself these questions as a grandmother, a woman and a therapist.

We had a wonderful speaker last month in Margaux Helm that works with families in crisis and surrounded by physical and  emotional violence. This month, Marti McClellan will speak to us on some of the challenges of mid life and parenting.

I challenge myself to be a better voice for those who cannot speak for themselves in what is often a maze of changing difficulties in the access of mental health for those in need. I hope you, too challenge yourself. May is Mental Health Month.

Please feel free to email me at anytime with suggestions or concerns,

Peace,

Ann Leber, LMFT

president@svccamft.org

President


  This issue:
· Letter From the Board
· Legal Beagle
· Don't forget to renew your membership!

·  Presentation Summary
· Upcoming Meeting
Information
· Upcoming Board Meetings

· Mental Health Community Events
· Interview with a Therapist
· Special Feature·
· Letters to the Editor

· Psyched about Books and Movies

· Advertising and Announcements

· Advertising Policy for the Newsletter

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
President:

Ann Leber, LMFT


President-Elect:
Patricia St. James, LMFT

Past President:
Jill  Lawler, LMFT

Secretary:
Becky Counter, LMFT

Treasurer:
Beverly Baldwin, MFT Intern

Members-At-Large:

Darlene Davis, LMFT
Joseph Borders, LMFT

Program Co-Chairs:
Carol Delzer, LMFT
Kari Deitrich, Trainee

Hospitality Co-Chairs:
Joshlynn Prakash, MFT Intern
Carol Mahr, LMFT
Nazia Khan, MFT Intern
Alexis Clemons, Trainee
Melinda Keeler, Trainee

Club 3000 Co-Chairs:
Sterling Evison, Trainee
Anna Garcia, Trainee
Charlotte Parks, LMFT

Volunteer Co-Chairs:
Maria Wheeler, LMFT
Amita Khare, Trainee
William Dickey, LMFT

Membership Co-Chairs:

Jenna Bell, MFT Intern
Michael Tablit, Trainee

Sponsorship Co-Chairs:
Rebecca Kneppel, MFT Intern
Sara Coffill, MFT Intern


Newsletter Editors:
Heather Blessing, LMFT
Margret Greenough, LMFT
Karen Ulep
, MFT Intern

Legislative Chair:

Bylaws Co-Chairs:
Jennifer Lombardi, LMFT
Elizabeth Roccucci, LMFT

IT:
Jen Huber, Intern


Communication Specialist
Karen Ulep, Intern


 

Legal Beagle

dectective.pngWelcome to the section of the SVC-CAMFT newsletter, Legal Beagle written by Darlene Davis, LMFT. The chapter thought it would be helpful to keep you updated on new laws, legislative pursuits or actions, as well as ongoing legal and ethical dilemmas we all face in our career as Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists, Interns, and Trainees. Please feel free to ask questions that you have and I will do my best to investigate and post your answer in the newsletter. Please note that articles are based on information from CAMFT and/or the BBS and have been researched to the best of my ability. This is not meant to be legal advice.  Please contact CAMFT or Board of Behavioral Sciences for any legal matters you need assistance for. 

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There are some major changes in our testing requirements that I spoke of last month and now the questions are flowing! I thought I’d try to speak to the interns or trainees soon to become interns on the changes again. What do they say it takes 8 times to learn something!

If you are an intern that is expecting to PASS the current Standard Written Examination by December 31st 2015 then you can just close this article and go back to your studying. I wish you success. If you are the majority of trainees or interns that are not expecting to pass the current Standard Written Examination by December 31st 2015 then read on.

Let’s divide this into two categories.

Trainees:

If you are a trainee and hope to receive your Intern registration between now and June 30th 2015 you will be required to take the new Law and Ethics Written Examination by June 30th 2017. Yes that’s right 2017. Before you give a sign of relief keep in mind that you will want to take it sooner rather than later because if you fail the examination you will have the opportunity to take it again every 90 days until your registration expires in 2017. If you do not pass your exam before your registration expires in 2017 you will be required to take a 12 education unit (equals 12 hours) Law and Ethics course.

If you are a trainee and hope to receive your Intern registration between July 1st 2015 and December 31st 2015 you will be expected to take the Law and Ethics Examination before your NEXT renewal period which would be between July 1st 2016 and December 31st 2016.  You will have the same opportunity to take it again every 90 days until your registration expires in 2016. If you do not pass your exam before your registration expires in 2016 you will be required to take a 12 education unit (equals 12 hours) Law and Ethics course.

If you are a trainee and hope to receive your Intern registration anytime in 2016 or beyond you will follow the guidelines listed under Interns listed below.

NOTE: Candidates that have an intern registration that expires in 2016 AND do not pass the Law and Ethics examination WILL be able to renew their intern registration ONE more time. This is considered a phasing in period. Beginning January 2017 you MUST pass the Law and Ethics examination or you will not have the opportunity to renew your intern registration.

 

Interns:

If you are already an intern and your intern registration expires BEFORE July 1st 2016 you will be expected to take the Law and Ethics Examination before your NEXT renewal period which would be between January 1st 2017 and June 30th 2017. If you fail the examination you will have the opportunity to take it again every 90 days until your registration expires in 2018. If you do not pass your exam before your registration expires in 2018 you will be required to take a 12 education unit (equals 12 hours) Law and Ethics course.

If you are currently an intern and your intern registration expires AFTER June 30th 2016 you will be expected to take the Law and Ethics Examination BEFORE July 1st 2016. You will be the first to take the examination!! If you fail the examination you will have the opportunity to take it again every 90 days until your registration expires in 2017. If you do not pass your exam before your registration expires in 2017 you will be required to take a 12 education unit (equals 12 hours) Law and Ethics course.

NOTE: Candidates that have an intern registration that expires in 2016 AND do not pass the Law and Ethics examination WILL be able to renew their intern registration ONE more time. This is considered a phasing in period. Beginning January 2017 you MUST pass the Law and Ethics examination or you will not have the opportunity to renew your intern registration.

Please note this is my understanding of the new law. There is a chance the law can be amended so please make sure you stay up to date during this change.

I also want to invite you to upcoming trainings beginning in July 2015 that I hope will help your success in passing the Law and Ethics Examination! Stay tuned at www.darlenedavismft.com and www.hope-counselingcenter.org for more information. You can also contact me at dardav2@earthlink.net


*****************************************


Darlene Davis, LMFT Executive Director HOPE; Healthy Outcomes for Personal Enrichment MFT Stipend Coordinator for Greater Sacramento Instructor of University of Phoenix www.darlenedavismft.com www.hope-counselingcenter.org

 





TO RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP
Go to Our Website http://www.svc-camft.org/join
And RENEW now so you don't miss out!




  April Presentation Summary

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Domestic Violence But Were Afraid to Ask
By: Margaux Helm, LMFT and Director of Programs at WEAVE. (2 CEUs)

Margaux presented on facts about domestic violence, WEAVE, and the services that are available to DV victims through WEAVE. WEAVE offers services to women, children, and men escaping domestic violence. They offer 24 hour telephone support, a confidential safehouse program for both men and women, counseling services on a sliding scale, free short term sexual assault counseling, free domestic and intimate partner violence group counseling, and free legal workshops. Margaux indicated that the 24 hour support line is also available to therapists looking for support with a case.

The Affordable Care Act brings some changes to the delivery of mental health. One of those changes is the requirement that insurance providers cover universal screening and brief counseling for domestic violence. Margaux provided attendees with a handout detailing other changes related to The Affordable Care Act, and a safety plan worksheet.

Margaux indicated that the term "intimate partner violence" (IPV) is currently preferred over the term "domestic violence" because it does not imply marriage or cohabitation. When you believe that IPV may be occuring in the relationship it is important to interview partners seperately and to establish a safety plan based on your findings.

Margaux made a distinction between PTSD and Complex Trauma. PTSD encompases past abuse, while complex trauma concerns ongoing abuse and risk. Some treatment approaches can be harmful to ongoing victims of IPV because they fail to distinguish trauma triggers from necessary vigilance.

When working with IPV victims it is important to provide support, acknowledge the abuse, identify strengths and positive coping, and provide resources. Sometimes it can be helpful to discuss "invisible types of birth control" such as IUDs.

Summary by Joe Borders, LMFT



 

May Meeting Information

Free Pre-licensed 3000 Club Meeting

Topic: Preparing for and Working in Private Practice for Pre-Licensed
Speaker: Heather Blessing, LMFT
Date:  Friday, May 15, 2015
Time: 8:30 AM to 9:30 AM
Note: Registration and membership are not required for the Pre-Licensed 3000 Club meeting

More info:

Heather Blessing will be discussing working for private practice as an intern and then as a licensed therapist.  From understanding internship agreements to what you need to get started after you are licensed.

Presenter Bio:

Heather Blessing just became licensed.  She has worked in private practice internships and now is in private practice.   

Location:
Heritage Oaks Hospital
4250 Auburn Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95841
(map)

Topic:  "Challenges of “Hot Flash Ladies” and their Adolescent Children- A Dialogue about the Menopause Transition
Presenter: Martha "Marti" McClellan-Morehouse, MA, LMFT Speaker, Author, Mentor Coach
Date:
 
Friday, May 15, 2015
Time:
9:30 AM to 12:00PM
Location: 
Heritage Oaks Hospital
4250 Auburn Blvd.
Sacramento, CA 95841
(map)

Workshop Information:
Are we adequately trained and prepared to address the problems, issues and concerns of menopausal women who are parenting adolescents?

This presentation is for health and well-being professionals whose clients include women living with the symptoms, impairments, pleasures, triumphs and victories of the menopause transition and are experiencing difficulties with their adolescent children.

Learning objectives:

  • ·       Raise awareness about the complications of the menopause transition
  • ·       Explore the challenges for women who are experiencing the changes associated with the menopause transition while parenting adolescents who are experiencing significant changes too
  • ·       Ignite a dialogue about mental health care for women who are experiencing this incredible rite of passage

Martha (Marti) McClellan-Morehouse is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (MFC 43084), a Continuing Education Provider (4532) and a Mentor Coach with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Marketing. In September 2014, she became an ordained minister.

She augmented her formal credentials to increase the probability that her clients would benefit from her diverse training. Therefore, she trained in mindfulness techniques, creativity for healing and Wilderness Advanced First Aid. Her work with clients is heavily influenced by ancient practices like the Medicine Wheel (a sacred hoop or stone monument symbolizing the cycle of life). However, she jokes that marriage, parenting and navigating the “Hot Flash Lady/Power Surge Queen” continuum taught her some of her most important life lessons.

In her early career she specialized in the treatment of traumatized children using cognitive behavioral treatment modalities. During her 16-years as a therapist, counselor, mentor, advocate, trainer and coach, Marti provided over 10,000 hours of services to over 400 clients/sojourners. Today she is the visionary and owner of StepINtuit Healing Arts Oasis, specializing in the well-being of women and advancing positive social change.


Includes continental breakfast and 2 CEUs

Early registration ends Tuesday, May 12th
Early registration rates*:
2015 Licensed Member of SVC-CAMFT, AAMFT-Sacramento, and all local chapters of CAMFT: $20
2015 Pre-Licensed Member of SVC-CAMFT, AAMFT-Sacramento, and all local chapters of CAMFT: $15
Non-Member: $30

*Add $5 for late or "at-door" registration
For information on joining SVC-CAMFT or renewing your membership for 2015 please email: info@sacramentovalleycamft.org



More Upcoming Meeting Information


 Month Topic Speaker Location         
 June 19
 Psycho-pharmacology
 John Preston Heritage Oaks
 July 18
 Law and Ethics Seminar
 David.Jenson/CAMFT
 University of Phoenix
 September 18
 Cultural Diversity
 Tonia Elliott-Walker
 Heritage Oaks
 October 16
 LGBT Panel
 LGBT Panel
 Heritage Oaks
 November 6
 Grief / Suicide Awareness TBA - AAMFT
 Rancho Cordova City Hall




 
 

Mental Health Community Events

This section will be for announcing Mental Health Community Events
such as walks/runs, fundraising, health fairs and other non-profit events.

To have an event listed please email newslettereditor@svccamft.org

May

May is quickly approaching, which means that Mental Health Matters Month
will soon be here! Each Mind Matters recognizes that this is an especially busy time of year for everyone working in behavioral health, so we've created an easy-to-use toolkit for raising awareness in your communities about the importance of mental health and wellness.

This toolkit contains a number of resources and materials that you can utilize to conduct May is Mental Health Matters Month activities locally, including:
·         Guides for planning events/activities and spreading the word through social media
·         “Millions Like Me” Social Media Challenge Activity
·         Ready-made, customizable flyers for use by your organization (no fancy software or special graphic skills required!)

Please share this link with your networks, in your newsletters, and on your websites!


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NAMI WALK - Every journey begins with that first step!
As NAMIWalks celebrates our 13th Anniversary in 2015, we are proud to be the largest and most successful mental health awareness and fundraising event in America! Through NAMIWalks' public, active display of support for people affected by mental illness, we are changing how Americans view persons with a mental illness. This is leading to ensuring that help and hope are available for those in need. Please join us as we improve lives and our communities one step at a time - Click Here for More Information
Location: William Land Park
1702 Sutterville Road
Sacramento, CA
Date: Sat May 02 2015
Distance: 5K
Check-in: 9:30 am
Start Time: 10:30 am

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June

Sacramento Pride

Capitol Mall between 4th and 7th streets
Saturday, June 6, 2015 at 11 a.m.
Hosted by:  Sacramento LGBT Community Center
Event Details

 
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Journey of Hope Art Event: Call to Writers and Artists
 
Calling all writers and artists!
 
Writers and artists are invited to submit works for a collaborative art event:
Journey of Hope: Real Life Stories of Living with Mental Health Challenges Portrayed Through Art
 
Artists and writers will be paired together to create a collaborative art piece.  Finished pieces will be shown at a community event on July 12, 2015 at the Elk Grove American Renaissance Institute of Arts (ARIA).
 
Artists and story writers please sign up by May 15, 2015.  For more information or to sign up, please email: journeyofhopeMH@yahoo.com
 
Story Writers: Share your experience with mental health challenges and journey of recovery (two pages max typed).  Submissions due June 1, 2015.
Writers, you may also create your own artwork to accompany your story.
 
Artists: Offer your artistic expression and portray someone’s story through your art.  Art pieces due July 1, 2015.
Thank you for your support of the “Mental Illness: It’s not always what you think” project,
 
Julie and Crystal

 
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THE OCD SACRAMENTO FOUNDATION AND THE INTERNATIONAL OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE FOUNDATION announce their 2nd Annual 1 Million Steps 4 OCD Walk in Sacramento at Southside Park on June 6th, 2015. Bring your family members, coworkers and friends and join us to help raise awareness about OCD and related conditions in our community, while also raising funds to support the important work of OCD Sacramento and the IOCDF.

The 1 Million Steps 4 OCD Walk is the first grassroots visibility and fundraising campaign to spotlight OCD on a national level. Proceeds will be used to improve access to effective treatment through educating mental health professionals and the general public about evidence-based treatments and supporting research into the causes of OCD and anxiety related disorders. Join us and be part of this very exciting movement of people advocating and raising awareness about OCD and related disorders!

For more information, contact Dr. Robin Zasio, Psy.D.,LCSW at 916.366.0647, Ext.4.
 
drrobin@atcsac.net 
 
 
http://OCDSacramento.org

 





Interview with a Therapist
Q:  Please state your name
A:  Heather Cassandra Blessing, MA, LMFT

Q:  What type of license/s do you hold?
A:  Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist

Q:  How long have you been licensed?
A:  I just received my license on April 21, 2015.

Q:  Where do you work? 
A:  I have a private practice in Sacramento

Q:  What client population/s do you work with?
A:  In my private practice I have two specialties: I specialize in transgender and gender
     expansive youth and also specialize in attachment and trauma with fost-adopt youth.

Q:  What type/s of therapy do you utilize in your mental health work?
A:  I primarily use Structural Family Therapy with some Theraplay, Narrative and
     Solution Focused tools.

Q:  Which, if any, certification/s or specialization/s do you have?
A:  Adoption Competency Certification, Level 1 Theraplay, Gender Specialist for Youth

Q:  Is there any further information about yourself that you’d like to provide?
A:  I believe that the challenges you go through in your own life will help you become a
     better therapist.

Q:  What made you decide upon a career in the mental health profession?
A:  I originally started out trying to find a "cure" for my daughter but then after much
     studying I found that relationships heal people and I really could help people by
     working with the families of children who have been traumatized. 

Q:  Which client populations or particular types of mental health issues have been the
        most challenging for you to work with?
A:  Severe trauma in children that have caused Reactive Attachment Disorder.  It takes
     a lot of work with the child and the parents.

Q:  How have you dealt with clients with poor boundaries?
A:  I keep firm with the client and help them use tools that will allow them to feel more
      successful and need me less urgently.

Q:  What advice would you give for a pre-licensed mental health professional
       contemplating private practice versus other workplace options? 
A:  Money will be tight and it will take more time to get your hours, but it can give you a
     chance to explore what therapeutic style works for you.  If your goal is to be a private
     practice therapist this is a good time to start learning the ropes.

Q:  Which personal attributes do you believe are most important for a therapist to
      possess?
A:  Being open minded and non-judgemental is probably the most important.  Being
     willing to realize when you do have your own beliefs that conflict with the client and
     how you deal with your own prejudices. 

Q:  What are the most prominent skills that you think are essential for a pre-licensed
      therapist to focus on developing?
A:  Being able to complete paperwork in a timely manner and also being willing to
     consult with your supervisor and/or other therapists about issues to get other
     perspectives.

Q:  Which mental health-related books have been your personal favorites or been most
       influential for you?
A:  The Gendered Self: Further Commentary on the Transsexual Phenomenon & Brain
      Based Parenting: The Neuroscience of caregiving for health attachment.

Q:  Are there any tools (e.g., specific assessments, games, etc.) that you find
      particularly effective for use in therapy?
A:  I use the Theraplay Book for many of my bonding tools this allows parents and
     children to experience fun will bonding together.

Q:  What has been the most challenging aspect of your career?
A:  Finding an internship that worked for me.

Q:  What have you found to be the most fulfilling and meaningful aspects of your
       career?
A:  Watching people and families find happiness and the ability to meet challenges on
      their own.

Q:   Did you have a mentor or a particular person that influenced your growth as a
       therapist? 
A:  A therapist my daughter had many, many years ago pushed me to look at my own
     issues and taught me Theraplay.  He showed me a whole different side to myself.

Q:  If so, what did you learn from that person and how did he or she contribute to your
       development as a mental health professional?
A:  He showed me that it was best when working with a child with Reactive Attachment
     Disorder that it was best to work with the entire family and focus on building positive
     moments. 

Q:  What were the factors involved in the process of creating your own therapeutic style?
A:  I learned to be authentic in my own self an use that to connect with the client.  I try to
     remember where the client is and work from their point of view and move with them
     not try to pull or push them forward.  From this I learned techniques and my own
     style that worked for me and my clients.

Q:  How have you maintained the balance between your career and personal life and
      how have you managed to foster your own self-care?
A:  I focus on scheduling hard clients in conjunction with my easier clients.  I will not put
     two really tough clients on the same day.  I make sure I save some time every day
     that is my own and I save a particular day each week for myself.  I schedule friends
     on my calendar as if they are clients so I do not cancel on a friend to take a client.  I
     make sure my phone is turned off or not accepting client calls at certain times of the
    day.

Q:  What do you know now that wish you knew before you became a licensed therapist?
A:  How complicated it would be to get on insurance panels.

Q:  What additional advice would you give to a pre-licensed therapist?
A:  Have open communication between you and your supervisor.  Ask questions - they
     are there to help you.






Special Feature

Raising Awareness of the Menopause Transition
by

Martha McClellan-Morehouse

Theorists like Sigmund Freud, Jean Piaget and Erik Erickson formalized concepts related to developmental theory. Their contributions, along with that of many others, gave us a blueprint for understanding and treating psychological challenges and disorders for clients at different stages of life. But their contributions were inadequate in regards to the specific needs for women experiencing the menopause transition and menopause.

Misinformation and inadequate research prior to the 1970’s fueled the stigma attached to what had been referred to as “hysteria” or “deficiency disease.” The disease models were not effective in the treatment, care and support of women experiencing the spectrum of difficulties and victories of menopause. Many women suffered in isolation from crippling conditions, symptoms and impairments related to menopause. And many women were not aware of their right to acknowledge and celebrate the victories.

The Menopause Transition: Today menopausal women are more empowered to ask questions, practice self-love and find appropriate treatment and care. Some of us are celebrating and ritualizing this great rite of passage. Women and some men are forming alliances to support our sisters to and through the process. We have also gained access to resources that ease suffering, especially during the menopause transition, also called perimenopause. Perimenopause is often considered the most difficult phase of menopause. It is the period when most symptoms are acute.

Perimenopause is defined by The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) as “a span of time typically lasting 6 years or more that begins with the onset of menstrual cycle changes and other menopause-related symptoms and extends through menopause (the last menstrual period) to 1 year after menopause.” Since 1989, NAMS has been “dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging.” They put a much needed spotlight on the importance of treatment, care and support of women experiencing the menopausal transition and beyond.

Awareness: If a woman is not aware that she has been thrust into perimenopause, she may suffer from symptoms that could easily be misdiagnosed, and subsequently mistreated. Too many women are still left to cope with the complexities, symptoms and impairments in isolation. Loved ones and care providers aren’t equipped to recognize the signs that the “change” is occurring.

So how can mental health care providers become more sensitized to the menopause transition and provide better care for women in midlife? Awareness of some basic facts could help care providers be more effective in the treatment and care of menopausal women. Be aware that the onset of the transition could begin for some women in their 30’s and others in their 50’s. Consider her family and medical history, physical condition and stressors. Be aware of the special needs that may be out of the mental health provider’s scope of practice. If appropriate, encourage collaboration with health and well-being professionals like nutritionists, physicians, spiritual advisors and others who can provide services, treatment and care. Be aware of and please consider possibilities beyond what is found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

I was not aware of the significance of this midlife change during my marriage and family therapist traineeship, or the early years of my internship. The subject of menopause never entered my mind as a possible reason for some of the symptoms presented by women I served. In retrospect, I wonder how many of my client’s issues, concerns, problems and behaviors could have been more easily addressed and resolved had I considered the effects of menopause.

I had to forgive myself for not providing more comprehensive treatment and care for some of my women clients who were experiencing severe midlife challenges. I know that my diagnoses were correct based on the criteria of the DSM. I also know that my approach to their treatment and care would have been different had I known to consider menopause as an underlying factor for some of their issues, concerns, problems and behaviors.

Presenting in the Therapy Room: Sitting in wisdom circles with mature women expanded my treatment and care toolkit for women in midlife. And asking women clients certain questions during initial client interviews/assessments, and hearing their answers revealed a list of considerations and revelations. The revelations awakened me to my own list of issues related to the menopause transition, and the importance of further investigation into what I could offer the women I served.

Below is a list of some complexities, symptoms and impairments that menopausal women may report or present in the therapy room.


  • ·       Questions sanity
  • ·       Questions identity and worth
  • ·       Hot and cold flushes
  • ·       Mood instability
  • ·       Crying spells
  • ·       Profound sadness
  • ·       Fatigue
  • ·       Irregular, erratic and/or heavy periods
  • ·       Fibroids
  • ·       Bladder and urinary problems
  • ·       Migraines
  • ·       Lower sex drive
  • ·       Vaginal dryness
  • ·       Difficulty concentrating
  • ·       Anxious and irritable
  • ·       Heart palpitations
  • ·       Joint and muscle discomfort
  • ·       Difficulties with memory
  • ·       Feeling uninspired
  • ·       Sleep disturbance
  • ·       Weight gain
  • ·       Family discord
  • ·       Relationship crises
  • ·       Problems at work
  • ·       Concerns about mortality
  • ·       Grieving
  • ·       Any number or combination of somatic symptoms
  • ·       Anger

A woman reporting and presenting in therapy with some of the symptoms listed above could be diagnosed with depression, anxiety, sexual dysfunction or disorder and any number of somatic, nonmedical or medical conditions and disorders. Even though medical intervention may be appropriate, recognizing the symptoms as menopause related could influence treatment and care strategies. If you are the first well-being professional that she engages, perhaps you can “pause,” normalize the symptoms and empower your client with the freedom to make more informed choices about her treatment and care. 

Unfortunately, too many women have limited or no access to well-informed health and wellness practitioners who recognize the link between menopause and what is reported and presented in the therapy room. In addition, there often is a significant absence of a “safety nest” for these women. This safety nest is a space where a woman can “lean into” and depend on people who help her gather and translate relevant information. This nest can also include places to go for respite and objects that remind her to stay connected to her “self” in the midst of “its” that happen.

Resources and Advocates: Fortunately, many women will not suffer in isolation or be crippled by menopause because of organizations like NAMS. Prominent voices like Lonnie Barbach, Ph.D who authored “The Pause” and Christiane Northrup, M.D., author of “The Wisdom of Menopause” have added their voices to a list of influential people speaking with women and advocating on behalf of women. These advocates have created forums for dialogue and platforms for a more wholistic approach to services. But the most important voices are the millions of women who are experiencing menopause and insisting on best practices in their health and well-being treatment and care.

There are a number of local and national resources available to women experiencing the trials, triumphs, symptoms, impairments, conquests, gifts, energy surges and victories of menopause. As mental health care providers, it behooves us to look into resources and raise our awareness of how we can be of service in a way that is consistent with our ethical, moral and legal obligations. If it is our intention to provide appropriate care for menopausal women, perhaps some of the resources listed below can help you increase access to additional treatment and care for the clients you serve. I welcome any feedback regarding what I have shared here, and thank you for your continued commitment to our diverse community. Be well!

Sacramento:
Women’s Health Specialists

http://www.womenshealthspecialists.org

Dr. Priscilla Monroe, RN, ND
http://www.drpriscillamonroe.com

StepINtuit Healing Arts Oasis

http://www.stepintuithao.com
http://www.meetup.com/SacTown-Hot-Flash-Ladies-Impact-Group

National:
The North American Menopause Society

http://www.menopause.org

Office of Women’s Health

http://www.womenshealth.gov

Mayo Clinic: Menopause
http://www.mayoclinic.org

Third Age
http://www.thirdage.com

Martha McClellan-Morehouse is a speaker and mentor coach. She is the author of “The Wisdom Chair: A Journey from Common Sense to Divine Wisdom” (McClellan-Morehouse, 2015). Contact her at marti@stepintuithao.com. Or visit the StepINtuit Healing Arts Oasis website www.stepintuithao.com for more information.

 

The views expressed in the Special Feature Articles do not necessarily reflect the Sacramento Valley Chapter of CAMFT or CAMFT. They should be understood as the personal opinions of the author. No information in this articles will be understood as official.  Other views and commentary are welcome and will be published as long as they are respectful and stick to the topic.

 


Letters to the Editor
Welcome to the Letters to the editor Section.  We want to hear what you want to say about SVC-CAMFT, CAMFT, current events and issues.  Please see below guidelines on submitting a letter.



 We Have No Letters to the Editor!  Let your voice be heard!  Write a letter to the editor!
__________________________________

 Letters to the Editor Guidelines
  • You must be a current SVC-CAMFT member.
  • You cannot be a SVC-CAMFT board member or employee.
  • It must be no more than 250 words.
  • You must send in your full name so I can verify that you are a member.
  • If you wish your name not to be published please indicate.
  • Any letter published without a name will be listed as Anonymous MFT or Anonymous pre-license or Anonymous Associate
  • All letters must be respectful and without inappropriate words or phrases including name calling.
  • Please send your letters to newslettereditor@sacramentovalleycamft.org
  • If you do not get a response back within 2 days that it has been received please email back.
  • ALL LETTERS RECEIVED WILL RECEIVE A RESPONSE THAT IT HAS BEEN RECEIVED AND WILL BE IN THE NEXT NEWSLETTER.
  • If there is a problem with the letter (language, misspellings, length or appropriateness) you will receive an email back with the reason for the rejection and a chance to fix the problem and send it back in. 

 

                                                           
Psyched about Books and Movies

Welcome to "Psyched about Books and Movies!"  Each month we include a book or movie review by one of our readers.  Please see below guidelines on submitting a review.  Happy reading!


Title:  The Transgender Child: A Handbook for Families and Professionals
Publisher: Cleis Press, Inc. San Francisco, CA
Copyright: 2008
Author: Stephanie Brill & Rachel Pepper
Reviewer:  Heather Blessing, LMFT
Review:  Whether you are familiar with transgender youth or if you don't even know what that means this book is helpful for a therapist, mental health professionals and parents.  Actually it would be helpful for anyone having to learn or work with transgender youth.  It talks about the stages, how to handle the educational system, legal issues and medical issues.  It is easy to read and very helpful when trying to get an idea of where to go next.  This is a book that has helped me know where I need to look for certain answers and what support I can see to further help my clients.

 

Book/Movie Review Submission Policy

All reviews are not to exceed 1000 key strokes.
Your review should include the title, a short synopsis about why you like or dislike it, and the author’s name & publication date. You can also include a picture of the book and/or movie. After review, we will publish your review in our next newsletter. Reviews submitted that are longer than 1000 characters will be returned for editing. It is best to type your review in a Microsoft Word document to note how many key strokes (characters with spaces), how big your review is, and for your own record keeping. You can then copy and paste it into the online submission form located here (http://www.sacramentovalleycamft.org/Newsletter.html) To learn more about checking your review for key strokes, spelling grammer and size click below: (http://www.sacramentovalleycamft.org/How_to_check_review_in_microsoft_word.doc).

It is your responsibility to check for spelling and grammar errors.  Reviews must be received by the 20th of the month in order to appear in the next newsletter.

You can submit your review by: Visiting our webpage: www.sacramentovalleycamft.org

Mailing it in: P.O. Box 163385, Sacramento, CA 95816

 





Advertising and Announcements




REPRESENTING VICTIMS OF CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE


Law Offices of Joseph C. George, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist (PSY 7480)
Attorney at Law (SBN 119231)
Free consultation.
Website: www.psyclaw.com
Telephone: 916.641.7300



FULL TIME PRIVATE OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE IN ROSEVILLE

One private office space available immediately for full time use in Roseville; perfect for private practice. Referrals and sublets possible. Please visit www.rosevilleofficespace.weebly.com for photos and details or call 916-783-0563.
 

HEALTH AND WISDOM PROGRAMS AND EVENTS
 

 

Health and Wisdom Programs and Events

 

For women living with the challenges and victories of the menopause transition:

·       Short-term, Solution-oriented Coaching

·       Self-love Mosaic Intensive

·       Wisdom Chair Journeys

·       Parties, retreats and groups

For health and well-being professionals:

  • ·     A Playshop- Creative Expression for Health and Well-being

 

Contact Martha “Marti” McClellan-Morehouse, MA, MFT MFC 43084 PCE 4532 at marti@stepintuithao.com or visit the StepINtuit Healing Arts Oasis website www.stepintuithao.com for more information. Or call (626) 755-7385 even if you just want to say hello.

 
ANNOUNCING UPCOMING TRAININGS SPONSORED BY
HOPE COUNSELING CENTER



DSM-5 Training Friday, June 5th 9-4p at National University Sacramento $120 6 CEU’s

Supervision Training Friday, July 24th 9-4p HOPE Counseling Center Roseville $100 6 CEU’s

See our website under training for specific information www.hope-counselingcenter.org

 

HOPE; Healthy Outcomes for Personal Enrichment Counseling Center, a 501(c) non-profit agency, offers affordable professional counseling in a comfortable, safe, and supportive environment. Our fees are on a sliding fee scale. We have locations in Folsom, Roseville, and downtown Sacramento. To learn more about HOPE Counseling Center, please visit

www.hope-counselingcenter.org and you can also call 916-780-1059 or 915-444-2170. Darlene Davis, LMFT, Executive Officer of HOPE; Healthy Outcomes for Personal Enrichment Counseling Center.

 
THE OCD SACRAMENTO FOUNDATION AND THE INTERNATIONAL OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE FOUNDATION
ANNOUNCE THEIR 2ND ANNUAL 1 MILLION SSTEPS 4 OCD WALK

Announce their 2nd Annual 1 Million Steps 4 OCD Walk in Sacramento at Southside Park on June 6th, 2015.

Bring your family members, coworkers and friends and join us to help raise awareness about OCD and related conditions in our community, while also raising funds to support the important work of OCD Sacramento and the IOCDF.

The 1 Million Steps 4 OCD Walk is the first grassroots visibility and fundraising campaign to spotlight OCD on a national level. Proceeds will be used to improve access to effective treatment through educating mental health professionals and the general public about evidence-based treatments and supporting research into the causes of OCD and anxiety related disorders. Join us and be part of this very exciting movement of people advocating and raising awareness about OCD and related disorders!

For more information, contact Dr. Robin Zasio, Psy.D.,LCSW at 916.366.0647, Ext.4.
 
drrobin@atcsac.ne
t  
 
http://OCDSacramento.org



 

Advertising Policy for the Newsletter

All ads and reviews are not to exceed 1000 key strokes. Chapter members advertise at no cost. Non-members can advertise about employment opportunities at no cost. Non-members, non employment-related ads follow these rates:

 

$10 for 200 key strokes

$20 for 201-600 key strokes

$30 for 601-1000 key strokes

Full page and ½ page ads are not accepted.

 

All ads contain text only; no graphics will be included.

Ads submitted that are longer than 1000 characters will be returned for editing. It is best to type your ad in a Microsoft Word document to note how many characters, how big your ad is, and for your own record keeping. Please visit our site to find more information on how to use Microsoft word for editing. You can then copy and paste it on our online submission form located here (http://www.sacramentovalleycamft.org/Newsletter.html)

It is your responsibility to check for spelling and grammar errors.

 

Ads must be received by the 25th of the month in order to appear in the next newsletter. Ads are placed in the order that they are received.

 

You can submit and pay for your ad by:

 

Visiting our webpage: www.sacramentovalleycamft.org

Mailing in payment: P.O. Box 163385, Sacramento, CA 95816

Emailing the Newsletter Editor: newslettereditor@sacramentovalleycamft.org

Thank you for contributing to the newsletter!

 
Copyright © 2015 {Organization_Name}. All rights reserved.
Contact email: {Organization_Contact_Email}

SVC-Camft
Contact us mail: P.O. Box 163385, Sacramento, CA 95816
Phone: (916) 350-1577
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